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The Center for Advanced Studies hosts annual symposia, bringing together international scholars working in the fields of archaeology, genetics, linguistics, and paleoanthropology. In order to create a stimulating environment for inter-disciplinary discussion, symposia are small meetings that feature a limited amount of invited speakers.

Symposium 2017

The third annual symposium of the DFG Center for Advanced Studies will highlight the theme of modern human origins and dispersal, with a focus on novel, multi-disciplinary research from East Africa. Drawing from the on-going investigations by the Junior Research Group led by Dr. Yonatan Sahle, as well as the collaborative research of the Center’s team and visiting fellows, the symposium will provide a venue for discussing the biological and cultural origins and evolution of modern humans, their dispersal within and outside of Africa, and insights from archaeogenetics and historical linguistics. Speakers ofthe symposium will present new and continuing research from field and laboratory work. Symposium proceedings will be scheduled for publication in 2018.

Symposium 2016 the official group photoThe second annual symposium of the DFG Center for Advanced Studies focused on the peopling of the Americas. Drawing from the success of Dr. Kurt Rademarker’s archaeological field season in Peru as DFG Center fellow in 2015, as well as the on-going research by current long-term fellow Dr. Lumila Menéndez, the symposium aimed to discuss the progress and prospect of integrated, multidisciplinary approaches for reconstructing the peopling of the Americas. Research on the topic has intensified in recent years, with some previously proposed models challenged by new data. Speakers of this symposium presented on new and on-going research on the topic, with dedicated time for discussion on points of convergence and disagreement by the different disciplines. Symposium proceedings will be scheduled for publication in 2017.

17-Scientists-of-the-world-uniteThe inaugural symposium, held in 2015, highlighted the progress and prospect of integrated, multidisciplinary approaches for reconstructing the human past.

 
 
 

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